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Tuesday
Feb012011

Apple beginning to clamp down on third-party content purchases?

This report in this morning’s New York Times by Claire Cain Miller and Miguel Helft has caused a stir in the Apple iPad community, because it suggests that Apple rejected the Sony eReader app in their App Store because it allowed the user to obtain ebooks that were not purchased from the iBookstore.

I am of the opinion that the writers of this story have it wrong. Their primary source seems to be Steve Haber, president of Sony’s digital reading division, who of course might have a bit of a beef with Apple now that their app has been rejected. While Haber says that their app was rejected because of ” might have been rejected for other reasons.

But, if the report is accurate, then it foreshadows the possibility that Apple might cut iPad users off from their Kindle app purchases at some point.  I am fairly confident that Apple would not do this, at least not yet anyway. Not with hardware competitors to the iPad just now entering the market. Also, Apple has never done this with music. You’ve always been able to add songs purchased from elsewhere to listen to on your iPad, iPod, or iPhone, so I find it unlikely that they would make such a policy shift.

I suspect that we might be able to glean more about this issue after the event to be held jointly by Apple and Rupert Murdoch, of News Corp., on Feb. 2nd of this year, to announce The Daily, an iPad only newspaper subscription that is to be made available in the App Store for iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad owners.

It will be a huge mistake and highly damaging to the iPad platform if the New York Times article is accurate with their hypothesis.

On a side note, with Steve Jobs out for now, it will interesting to see which Apple representative will be beside Rupert Murdoch when the announcement is made. Will it be Tim Cook, the COO, and current interim CEO, or Phil Schiller, the VP of Marketing, or perhaps someone else from the one of the other divisions that we rarely see?

 

 

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